Researcher studies Vision Zero Cancer for future innovation

Are milieus like Vision Zero Cancer a good way to accelerate innovation? At Stockholm School of Economics, doctoral student John-Erik Bergkvist is researching this – the methodology for building a vision-driven innovation milieu.

John-Erik Bergkvist, PhD student at House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics

Vision Zero Cancer aims to be an innovation milieu that engages actors from different sectors and disciplines to achieve a common vision: that no one should have to die of cancer. The phenomenon of vision-driven innovation milieus is not new – but there is not much research on it, yet. Doctoral student John-Erik Bergkvist, at House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics, is working on changing that.
“Vision Zero Cancer is an exciting organization,” he says. “They are based on a call from The Swedish Innovation Agency, Vinnova, around vision-driven health. Based on ideas that innovation can be accelerated through cooperation and a clear direction.”

It is based on the idea that it’s rarely one actor that accounts for the entire value. In the case of cancer care, there are many actors. The pharmaceutical industry, the medtech industry, doctors, nurses, IT-functions – all that is required for good cancer care. The idea is that these actors should not innovate individually but explore joint missions in a broader ecosystem.

Previous research has mainly focused on collaborations between organizations or ways of coordinating ecosystems that are centered around a certain product. Vision Zero Cancer is more about creating an arena and conditions for long-term dialogue – so that collaboration becomes natural. Preferably in slightly unexpected constellations.
“Theoretically, it’s about changing informal and formal institutions. The assumption in Vinnova’s call is that broad arenas for knowledge exchange can give birth to new ideas and increase innovation capacity in the ecosystem as a whole.”

Words such as cross-sectoral, cross-disciplinary, flexible, and dynamic permeate the call.
“It is based on the idea that it’s rarely one actor that accounts for the entire value. In the case of cancer care, there are many actors. The pharmaceutical industry, the medtech industry, doctors, nurses, IT-functions – all that is required for good cancer care. The idea is that these actors should not innovate individually but explore joint missions in a broader ecosystem. And try to get the ecosystem to bring about system transformation.”

Healthcare is more than just the treatment itself; it is also a matter of organizing to carry out the treatment. In which knowledge of how to do it effectively is needed.

John-Erik Bergkvist will follow how Vision Zero Cancer is built up and received, which drivers and hindering factors there are. A longitudinal case study. This will be the theme of one of the articles in his doctoral thesis, which usually contains four to five articles.
“The rest is made up of experimental studies around what factors matters to those who are going to engage with the ecosystem, how innovative ability is affected by education and how receptive different professions are to the ideas of other professions”

The fact that Vision Zero Cancer is an innovation milieu within healthcare was something that attracted John-Erik Bergkvist, who has experience within healthcare from before. His CV includes positions as an analyst at the Swedish Agency for Health and Social Care Analysis and analyst at the Swedish Government Offices’ writing an Official Government report on the subject ‘The future specialist nurse – new role, new opportunities’. He is well versed in the challenges facing healthcare. Organization is one of them.
“Healthcare is more than just the treatment itself; it is also a matter of organizing to carry out the treatment. In which knowledge of how to do it effectively is needed.”

There is certainly scepticism about initiatives perceived as “external” fabrications. However, Vision Zero cancer exhibits characteristics that are beneficial. They consist of a wide mix of people “from within” healthcare. And not only from the profession, but also patients, the pharmaceutical industry and the medtech industry

By studying Vision Zero Cancer and the conditions for innovation, John-Erik Bergkvist hopes to be able to generate knowledge about its way of organizing and draw general conclusions that can be used for similar milieus. To learn if vision-driven innovation environments are something for the future. In this he is supervised by Associate Professor Anna Essén.
“John-Erik’s research contributes to the vision by critically reviewing what Vision Zero Cancer actually does. Sometimes you don’t do what you think you’re doing. It increases Vision Zero Cancer’s own ability to reflect and thus the capacity to adapt, improve, and achieve its goals.

Anna Essén, assistant professor at House of Innovation, Stockholm School of Economics

Anna Essén points out that innovation milieus are nothing new but have existed in different contexts in the past. With varied results.
“There is certainly scepticism about initiatives perceived as “external” fabrications. However, Vision Zero cancer exhibits characteristics that are beneficial. They consist of a wide mix of people “from within” healthcare. And not only from the profession, but also patients, the pharmaceutical industry and the medtech industry.”

Vision Zero Cancer matches actors with complementary ideas – it thereby reduces transaction costs and allows actors to leverage their investments. No one can build a complete solution for a transformation of cancer care themselves. A viable approach is therefore to enable actors to combine and recombine their nisched ideas and offerings with other’s contributions. I think Vision Zero Cancer is making a difference here already – by facilitating such combinations.

The network of actors is something that Anna Essén sees as a strength.
“Vision Zero Cancer matches actors with complementary ideas – it thereby reduces transaction costs and allows actors to leverage their investments. No one can build a complete solution for a transformation of cancer care themselves. A viable approach is therefore to enable actors to combine and recombine their nisched ideas and offerings with other’s contributions. I think Vision Zero Cancer is making a difference here already – by facilitating such combinations.”

Vision Zero Cancer challenges the prevailing ecosystem

Fewer people shall get ill and die from cancer. For that to work, we need to think in new ways. Both in terms of developing new solutions and getting better at using what is available.

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Vision Zero Cancer becomes host of research network

To transform cancer from a deadly to a curable or chronic disease it is crucial to improve the precision in cancer treatment and follow-up of individual patients’ cancer disease. The Partnership for Precision Medicine in Cancer and Vision Zero Cancer are joining forces to accelerate research into precision medicine, with the aim to benefit every cancer patient.

Partnership for Precision Medicine in Cancer (PPMC) is a network to promote Swedish translational research on precision medicine in cancer. Among other things, this is done through creating better conditions and organization for elevating research.

“We are creating a common way of working in collecting samples and clinical data from cancer patients,” says one of PPMC’s founders Tobias Sjöblom, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology at Uppsala University, Director of the Research Infrastructure of Biobank Sweden, BBMRI and Program Director for U-CAN.

Tobias Sjöblom is responsible for the national coordination of the PPMC network. The goal is to be able to include more cancer patients in translational research projects on precision medicine regardless of where in Sweden they live. The aim is also to direct focus externally and find synergies with other actors who share our vision.

To further these goals, Vision Zero Cancer becomes the host for outreach activities and external engagement. Vision Zero Cancer is an innovation milieu Vision Zero Cancer is a Swedish innovation milieu that engages actors across society in strategic actions to work jointly in the mission of eliminating cancer as a cause of death and enable more people to livfe longer and better. As host for PPMC, Vision Zero Cancer will plan and implement outreach activities, develop pathways for connecting other diagnoses in addition to lung cancer to the network and finding models for funding to keep collecting patient samples and enable research.

“We want to stimulate the interest regarding research in precision medicine within industry, healthcare, financiers and patients” says Hans Hägglund, MD, Professor, National Cancer Coordinator and Chairman of Vision Zero Cancer. Research grounded in clinical reality is a step towards no one having to die of cancer.

Together, the two actors will develop a flexible, cross-sectoral and cross-functional model for shared hosting. For seamless integration, Tobias Sjöblom, will become part of the core team at Vision Zero Cancer and the Head of Vision Zero Cancer, Ebba Hallersjö Hult, will become part of the PPMC network’s steering group.

Contact

Ebba Hallersjö Hult, Tel. +46 72 711 44 91, [email protected],  Vision Zero Cancer

Tobias Sjöblom, Tel. +46 70 167 90 39, [email protected]www.igp.uu.se

Dialogue improves research

Healthcare has become more and more production oriented. We think that is the wrong way to go. On the one hand, it is difficult for staff to maintain resilient conditions and, on the other hand, the time for research and studies decreases. And research and studies are crucial to developing healthcare and furthering innovation.

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